Fabulous

Measles Resurgence Sparks Urgent Warning to Parents as Vaccination Rates Decline

Measles Resurgence Sparks Urgent Warning to Parents as Vaccination Rates Decline
Published 2 months ago on Jan 15, 2024

 The decline in measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccination rates is being held responsible for a series of outbreaks, raising fears that children may face severe consequences unless vaccination uptake improves significantly.

Alarming Statistics: Recent data from the UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA) reveals a substantial increase in measles cases, with 1,603 suspected cases reported in England and Wales in 2023. This figure more than doubles the 735 cases logged in 2022 and is nearly five times higher than the 360 cases reported in 2021. The rising trend underscores the urgency of addressing vaccination disparities.

Outbreaks and Hospitalizations: The West Midlands is currently grappling with a major measles outbreak, witnessing over 50 children requiring hospital treatment for the virus in the last month alone. This outbreak marks the region's most severe since the mid-1990s. Simultaneously, a significant number of cases have been reported in London, dispelling the notion of the UK's measles-free status achieved in 2019.

Vaccination Uptake Decline: Health officials attribute the surge in measles cases to the declining uptake of the MMR vaccine, emphasizing the importance of both doses for effective protection. The national proportion of fully-jabbed five-year-olds has fallen to 84.5%, the lowest in over a decade. The rise of anti-vaxx beliefs is considered a contributing factor to this concerning trend.

Expert Insights: Dr. Naveed Syed, a consultant in communicable disease control at the UKHSA, warns that the West Midlands is witnessing a daily rise in measles cases due to insufficient MMR uptake. He urges parents to ensure their school-going children have received both doses of the vaccine. Professor Sir Andrew Pollard, chair of the Government's vaccine taskforce, underscores the potential reappearance of measles-related complications and deaths if vaccination coverage does not improve.

Geographical Disparities: NHS Digital data reveals regional discrepancies in MMR vaccination rates among five-year-olds. Areas such as Hackney in East London report as low as 56.3% fully-protected children, contributing to worries about potential school exclusions during outbreaks. Similar concerns are echoed in Camden, Enfield, Liverpool, Manchester, and Birmingham.

Causes and Concerns: Measles, highly infectious and with no specific treatment, can lead to severe health complications. The decline in MMR uptake traces back to the discredited study by Andrew Wakefield, which falsely linked vaccines to autism. Although MMR rates have somewhat recovered, the recent surge in anti-vax sentiment during the COVID-19 pandemic has further fueled concerns about declining vaccination rates.

Health Guidelines and Recommendations: Health authorities stress the urgency of vaccination, emphasizing the safety and effectiveness of the MMR vaccine. Urgent recommendations include checking children's vaccination records and ensuring they receive any missed doses promptly. Measles, while typically producing flu-like symptoms and a rash, can lead to serious complications if left unchecked.

Conclusion: As measles cases surge across the UK, health officials urgently call on parents to prioritize their children's vaccination against the preventable disease. The rise in measles highlights the critical need for public awareness, dispelling vaccine misinformation, and fostering a collective effort to ensure the safety and well-being of the population. The consequences of inadequate vaccination are not only immediate but also pose a threat to the hard-earned progress in eradicating measles.

IS ANDREW WAKEFIELD'S DISCREDITED AUTISM RESEARCH TO BLAME FOR LOW MEASLES VACCINATION RATES? 
 

In 1995, gastroenterologist Andrew Wakefield published a study in The Lancet showing children who had been vaccinated against MMR were more likely to have bowel disease and autism. 

He speculated that being injected with a 'dead' form of the measles virus via vaccination causes disruption to intestinal tissue, leading to both of the disorders. 

After a 1998 paper further confirmed this finding, Wakefield said: 'The risk of this particular syndrome [what Wakefield termed 'autistic enterocolitis'] developing is related to the combined vaccine, the MMR, rather than the single vaccines.' 

At the time, Wakefield had a patent for single measles, mumps and rubella vaccines, and was therefore accused of having a conflict of interest. 

Nonetheless, MMR vaccination rates in the US and the UK plummeted, until, in 2004, the editor of The Lancet Dr Richard Horton described Wakefield's research as 'fundamentally flawed', adding he was paid by a group pursuing lawsuits against vaccine manufacturers. 

The Lancet formally retracted Wakefield's research paper in 2010. 

Three months later, the General Medical Council banned Wakefield from practising medicine in Britain, stating his research had shown a 'callous disregard' for children's health. 

On January 6, 2011, The British Medical Journal published a report showing that of the 12 children included in Wakefield's 1995 study, at most two had autistic symptoms post vaccination, rather than the eight he claimed. 

At least two of the children also had developmental delays before they were vaccinated, yet Wakefield's paper claimed they were all 'previously normal'. 

Further findings revealed none of the children had autism, non-specific colitis or symptoms within days of receiving the MMR vaccine, yet the study claimed six of the participants suffered all three.

Measles: A Serious and Highly Contagious Disease

Measles is a highly contagious viral infection that can cause serious complications, even death, if not addressed promptly. While it's often considered a childhood illness, adults can also contract measles, especially those who haven't been vaccinated or have weakened immune systems.

Here's a breakdown of the seriousness of measles and its key aspects:

Seriousness:

  • Highly contagious: Measles spreads easily through coughing, sneezing, and close contact with an infected person. It's one of the most contagious infectious diseases.
  • Complications: While some people experience mild symptoms, measles can lead to serious complications like pneumonia, encephalitis (brain inflammation), and even death, especially in young children and adults with weakened immunity.
  • Long-term effects: Measles can cause subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE), a rare but fatal brain disorder that can develop years after the initial infection.

Symptoms:

  • Fever: High fever (over 103°F) is a common early symptom.
  • Cough: A dry, hacking cough is another common symptom.
  • Runny nose and conjunctivitis: A runny nose and red, watery eyes are also typical symptoms.
  • Rash: A red, flat rash that appears 3-5 days after the initial symptoms and spreads from the face to the rest of the body is a hallmark sign of measles.

Adults and Measles:

  • Adults can get measles: While more common in children, adults who haven't been vaccinated or have weakened immunity are also susceptible to measles.
  • Complications are more severe in adults: Adults, especially those over 20, are at higher risk of developing serious complications from measles compared to children.

Chickenpox vs. Measles:

While both chickenpox and measles cause itchy rashes, they are caused by different viruses and have distinct features:

  • Rash: The measles rash is flat and red, starting on the face before spreading to the body. The chickenpox rash is vesicular, meaning it forms small, fluid-filled blisters.
  • Other symptoms: Fever, cough, and runny nose are common in measles but not in chickenpox.
  • Contagiousness: Measles is much more contagious than chickenpox.

Treatment:

There is no specific cure for measles, but treatment focuses on managing symptoms and preventing complications. This includes:

  • Supportive care: Fluids, pain relievers, and fever reducers can help ease symptoms.
  • Vitamin A: Vitamin A supplements can help boost the immune system and reduce the risk of complications.
  • Antibiotics: Antibiotics may be prescribed to prevent secondary bacterial infections like pneumonia.

Prevention:

The best way to prevent measles is through vaccination. The measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine is safe and effective, providing nearly 97% protection against measles with two doses.

Remember:

  • Measles is a serious and potentially life-threatening disease.
  • Anyone who hasn't been vaccinated or has weakened immunity is at risk.
  • Vaccination is the best way to prevent measles and protect yourself and others.


Measles: A Comprehensive Overview

Measles is a highly contagious viral infection that can cause serious complications, especially in young children and adults with weakened immunity. Let's explore the key aspects of this potentially dangerous disease:

Symptoms:

  • High fever (over 103°F)
  • Dry, hacking cough
  • Runny nose and conjunctivitis (red, watery eyes)
  • Koplik spots: Tiny white spots with bluish-white centers inside the mouth on the inner lining of the cheek. These are considered a diagnostic sign of measles.
  • A red, flat rash that appears 3-5 days after the initial symptoms and spreads from the face to the rest of the body. The rash starts as small, flat spots that join together to form larger patches.

Treatment:

  • There is no specific cure for measles, but treatment focuses on managing symptoms and preventing complications:
    • Supportive care: Fluids, pain relievers, and fever reducers can help ease symptoms

Vitamin A: Vitamin A supplements can help boost the immune system and reduce the risk of complications.

Antibiotics: Antibiotics may be prescribed to prevent secondary bacterial infections like pneumonia.


Prevention:

  • The best way to prevent measles is through vaccination:
    • The measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine is safe and effective, providing nearly 97% protection against measles with two doses.
    •  
      • Vaccination is recommended for all children at 12-15 months old and a booster dose at 4-6 years old.
      • Adults who haven't been vaccinated or have weakened immunity should also get vaccinated.

Causes:

  • Measles is caused by the measles virus, a highly contagious virus that spreads through coughing, sneezing, and close contact with an infected person.

Transmission:

  • Measles is very contagious and can spread easily through the air and close contact with an infected person.
  • An infected person is contagious from 4 days before to 4 days after the rash appears.
  • People with measles should isolate themselves at home and avoid contact with others until they are no longer contagious.

Measles in Adults:

  • While more common in children, adults can also contract measles, especially those who haven't been vaccinated or have weakened immunity.
  • Complications are more severe in adults, with an increased risk of pneumonia, encephalitis (brain inflammation), and even death.

Additional Resources:

Remember, vaccination is the best way to protect yourself and others from measles. Talk to your doctor if you have any questions or concerns about measles or the MMR vaccine.
 

Comments

  • Written news comments are in no way https://www.showbizglow.com it does not reflect the opinions and thoughts of. Comments are binding on the person who wrote them.